At the Foot of the Cross

foot of the cross

Painting by Robert S Duncanson at Detroit Institute of Art

You will be consoled according to the greatness of your sorrow and affliction; the greater the suffering, the greater will be the reward.  
–St. Mary Magdalen de’Pazzi

 

This year has been a year of many trials for me and my family.  Sometimes when I am in the midst of suffering where all I can see is pain, I imagine myself standing at the foot of the cross. Staring at the pain of the whole world taken on by Christ. All my human eyes would have seen would have been pain and death. But God had a plan. Resurrection. The story didn’t end there. God is writing a better story with your life than you can ever possibly imagine. In the middle of your pain when you can’t see the other side, he whispers “trust”. His dreams for you really are bigger than your own because His is borne of true love and total forgiveness.

I was reminded of this the other day when I watched this video again.  If you are suffering. Know that God is right there with you.  You can let suffering make you bitter, or you can let suffering make you grateful.  The grateful heart is the path to holiness and Sainthood.

I have felt drawn lately to pray the chaplet of Our Lady of Sorrows.  There is actually a special seven beaded Rosary for this.  I am posting it here because it has brought me much consolation.  If you don’t have a Our Lady of Sorrows Rosary, you can use a regular Rosary, just stop after seven Hail Mary’s and follow the directions below.

 

Rosary of the Seven Sorrows of Mary

Begin with An Act of Contrition:

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee,
and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of heaven, and the pains of hell;
but most of all because they offend Thee, my God,
Who are all good and deserving of all my love.
I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace,
to confess my sins, to do penance, and to amend my life.
Amen.

The First Sorrow of Mary – The Prophecy of Simeon

Reading Luke 2:22-35.

When Mary and Joseph presented the infant Jesus in the temple forty days after his birth, Simeon received the Divine Child in his arms and praised God. He predicted that a “sword” (of sorrow) would pierce Mary’s soul.

The Second Sorrow -The Flight into Egypt

Reading: Matthew 2:13-15.

When King Herod ordered the death of all male children age two or younger, Mary and Joseph fled to Egypt with the infant Jesus. The journey was a dangerous one and comforts were none. Instead of asking her son for a miracle, she knew it was the will of God and they lived in Egypt for seven years – strangers in a foreign land.

The Third Sorrow -The Child Jesus Lost in the Temple

Reading: Luke 2: 41-50.

When Jesus was twelve years old, he went with his parents to Jerusalem for the Feast of Passover. After losing the child Jesus on the return journey, Mary and Joseph searched for Him with agonizing sorrow for three days, finding Him at last in the temple.

The Fourth Sorrow – Mary meets Jesus carrying the cross

Reading: Luke 23: 27-29.

As Jesus made His way to Calvary, condemned to crucifixion, he met His dear mother. He was bruised, derided, cursed and defiled and her sorrow was absolute as Jesus dragged His own cross up the hill of His crucifixion.

The Fifth Sorrow – Mary at the foot of the cross

Reading: John 19: 25-30.

Mary stood at the foot of the Cross near her dying Son unable to minister to him as He cried out “I thirst.” She heard Him promise heaven to a thief and forgive His enemies. Mary watched her Son die a shameful death after three hours of pain on the Cross. She was devastated with grief and pain. Truly her heart has been pierced with a sword.

The Sixth Sorrow -Mary receives the body of Jesus

Reading: Psalm 130.

Jesus was taken down from the cross and His body placed in Mary’s arms. The passion and death are over, but for His mother, grief continues. Just as in the days of Bethlehem, she held him close to her heart but now His flesh was torn to pieces, gaping wounds covered His body, and the blood completely disfigured His adorable countenance! Mary herself was transfixed with such a sword of sorrow that her relatives and friends feared she would die of grief then and there. All who looked at the Mother of God in her sorrow were
stricken with ardent love and compassion.

The Seventh Sorrow – Mary witnesses the burial of Jesus

Reading: Luke 23: 50-56.

Mary wrapped the body of Jesus in the Holy Shroud which covered His Bloody wounds. The body of Jesus was laid in the tomb. As she bid farewell to her Son, her heart suffered so much anguish and grief.

Conclusion

Recite Three Haily Marys in remembrance of the tears shed by Our Blessed Mother. These are said to obtain true sorrow for our sins.

V. Pray for us, O most sorrowful Virgin.
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray

Lord Jesus, we now implore, both for the present and for the hour of our death, the intercession of the most Blessed Virgin Mary, Thy Mother, whose holy soul was pierced at the time of Thy passion by a sword of grief. Grant us this favor, O Saviour of the world, Who liveth and reigneth with the Father and the Holy Ghost, forever and ever. Amen

Virgin Most SorrowfulPray for Us – Say 3 times.

About veilofveronica

I am a mother and wife as well as an RCIA and Adult Faith Formation catechist at a parish in the south. I have 3 children and a great husband.
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2 Responses to At the Foot of the Cross

  1. Jeff Coleman says:

    Thanks for sharing that awesome story

    On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 10:15 AM, Veil of Veronica wrote:

    > veilofveronica posted: ” Painting by Robert S Duncanson at Detroit > Institute of Art You will be consoled according to the greatness of your > sorrow and affliction; the greater the suffering, the greater will be the > reward. –St. Mary Magdalen de’Pazzi This year has been” >

  2. I’ve offered my night’s Rosary for you, Susan. You and your blog will be in my intentions at Mass tomorrow. Keep this light burning, Susan. As it gets darker, more people will have need of it.

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